Camden

Camden is an inner city district of London that you can reach by tube with the Northern line. It was one of my favourites locations to waste time in London because it has a lot of places to get lost, to enjoy, to rest, to eat or to find lovely and original trinkets to buy as souvenirs.

Here you can find the The Roundhouse Theatre, a locomotive engine roundhouse constructed in 1847 for the London and Birmingham Railway that was converted to a theatre, arts centre and music venue in the 1966 (it launched the underground paper “International Times” in 1966, it hosted The Doors’ only UK appearance in 1968, and the Greasy Truckers Party in 1972).

And of course, this is the place where the eclectic markets of Camden Town take place. This market, also called Camden Locks, is a labyrinth of stores and stalls that sell clothing, books, crafts and an assortment of fascinating goods new and old. It was truly amusing to wander its eccentric cobbled lanes or rest sitting on the edge of its canals.

The place is divided in six sectors:

Camden stables market: Here you can find the latest in alternative fashion (for example in the shop “cyberdog” one of the largest in stables market) , vintage clothing shops, and a lot of antique stuff.

The stables

You can also visit the former 200 year old grade II listed horse hospital, that used to care for horses injured pulling canal barges and now is the location of club Proud Camden a live music venue hosting the best eclectic music in North London. It has a secret garden, a beautiful and relaxing outside space where you can eat; the stables, exclusive and private spaces individually designed some has karaoke, other dance poles; and  a place where you can see an exposition of art or photographs.

Proud Camden

This area has a sector in which you can enjoy of a huge choice of food from almost every country, plenty of places to sit with your plate and watch the passing crowd of visitors.

Marrakech in Camden

Camden Lock Market: Established in 1975 this was the original market. Here you can find board games, a wide range of music and cult films and independent bookshops with a lot of genres to choose from. There’s also a lot of places to buy stuff to decorate your home and vast number of stalls and shops which sell unusual and original gifts.

Camden Lock

Inverness street: It has been the location of a small but popular fruit and vegetable market supplying the Camden Town community since around 1900. This street is well-known for its excellent continental style bar/restaurants which stay open late and a number of specialist shops.

Buck street market: Situated on Camden High Street (opposite Inverness Street) this busy mess of around 200 stalls in narrow alleyways is one of several separate markets off the Camden High street/Chalk Farm Road. A few stall holders sell their own designs of jewellery and clothing and are particularly worth seeking out.

Camden motorcycle seats and a lion

Camden lock village: It bustles with more than 500 attractive independent shop-units selling a varied and exciting range of products, not just clothing and accessories but more unusual items. It runs alongside the Regent’s Canal towpath, to the north-east of the road bridge on Chalk Farm Road.

The horse or the Kelpie

The main streets: Camden High Street, with its continuation Chalk Farm Road, is a busy thoroughfare, lined with amazing shops, pubs, small indoor markets, and restaurants which overflow into the side streets. Walk the mile along here, between Camden Town and Chalk Farm Underground stations, and you can stop, and shop in all the markets of Camden.

Regent's Canal

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